Unspecified vulnerabilities

If you're a pentester, it's probably not news to you that "least disclosure" policies for disclosing vulnerabilities are fruitless. Unfortunately, they are even counterproductive for the entire security ecosystem and I will try to convince you within this post.

Before going any further, let's explain what "least disclosure" actually means.
In a nutshell, least disclosure is about providing the least necessary facts of vulnerabilities that are needed to know if a user might be affected and what the possible impact would be. No technical details, no exploits, no proof-of-concept code.

As mentioned here, you may argue that it increases the overall security as a random "black hat needs to put some efforts in thinking and coding before he's able to exploit a vulnerability".

However, we all claim that "security through obscurity" is bad:

  • Aggressors don't have time constraints. They can analyze patches, read all documentation and spend nights on a single flaw

  • No technical details in the wild generally means no signatures and detectors in security tools

  • "Least Disclosure" tends to degenerate in "Unspecified Vulnerability in Unspecified Components". Please fix your computer and don't ask why
Although we cannot certainly force vendors' disclosure policies, sharing the outcome of any security research may be beneficial at the end of the day.

Thoughtful reader, please note that getting profit from vulnerabilities does not necessary implicate concealing details. For instance, see the Mozilla Security Bounty Program FAQ.
We're rewarding you for finding a bug, not trying to buy your silence
If you enjoy the spirit, you may appreciate the following posts. Welcome back NibbleSec readers!

@_ikki

3 comments:

  سما احمد

September 12, 2015 at 4:02 AM

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  سما احمد

September 12, 2015 at 4:02 AM

This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
  سما احمد

September 12, 2015 at 4:02 AM

This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.